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HSFPP Stories of Impact

I Knew My Students Got it When...

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Thank you to all of the educators who submitted stories for the "I Knew My Students Got It When ..." contest in 2016. Your inspirational stories highlighted how deeply financial educators can impact students' lives.

Ten contest winners were selected at random to receive a NEFE scholarship to attend the Jump$tart National Educator Conference. Here are stories submitted by five of the winners:


I was in the hallway between classes and my students and others from the school were talking about opening accounts at a local bank to put the money earned from their new part-time jobs to save for a car, college and retirement. During this conversation they said to me, "Isn't that right, Mrs. Landen? You need to designate portions of your income to pay bills and save for short-term goals, along with your future retirement."

by Rebecca Landen, Batavia, Ohio


A time that stands out is when a student asked me for an extra copy of the student guides because he wanted to take it home to his parents. He said, "My parents should know this stuff!"

by Brenda Paxton, Wilder, Idaho


I know I have made an impact when, at graduation, various students tell me how much the Dollars and Sense class helped them prepare for college and the real world.

by Michael Schwarze, San Antonio, Texas


When I was working in California as a NJROTC instructor, a young cadet approached me and said "I have $2,000 and want to invest it to help my family.” She was teaching what I taught her to her parents. This young cadet's parents work on a strawberry field and depend on her to invest their hard earned cash.

by Israel Gonzalez, Miami, Fla.


I was teaching a class of financial literacy students about investing and picking stocks in companies. Some students chose sports and other students chose academics or clubs. I then said, "Now pretend that your little brother came up to you and said, “I really think you can do that better.” How would that go over? They all answered, “Not very well.” I explained the difference between a broker and an advisor, and told them that those people have the best advice for them when it comes to picking stocks as an amateur. Afterwards I had a student turn to me and say (his words, not mine)  "Oh, I get it Ms. Williams. This was a lesson, right?"

by Kristy Williams, Casper, Wyo.